Tuesday, December 09, 2008

Updating the Classics...For Facebook

Elizabeth Bennet has accepted your friend request.

I saw austenbook pop up in a friend's Google reader feed - and I love this rendering of Pride and Prejudice in Facebook format. Apparently, there is a trend in the adaptation of classic tomes into news feed style posts - and this new form of textual engagement makes me smile. But...I could imagine naysayers making an argument about our sound bite culture's need to chew up and spit out literature as short snippets.

What do ya'll think? The future of the book?


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Where are all the jobs for women?

Linda Hirshman reflects on women and the current economic crisis in the NYTimes.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Wednesday, December 03, 2008

For Caffeine Addicts

I do love me some coffee - and, finally, there is an illustrated recitative about such relationships.

Kudos to KG for the link!

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Saturday, November 29, 2008

Regulation of the Public Sphere

The NYTimes Magazine has a great article about regulation of the public sphere of the world wide web.  A snippet: 
Today the Web might seem like a free-speech panacea: it has given anyone with Internet access the potential to reach a global audience. But though technology enthusiasts often celebrate the raucous explosion of Web speech, there is less focus on how the Internet is actually regulated, and by whom. As more and more speech migrates online, to blogs and social-networking sites and the like, the ultimate power to decide who has an opportunity to be heard, and what we may say, lies increasingly with Internet service providers, search engines and other Internet companies like Google, Yahoo, AOL, Facebook and even eBay.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Unbelievable

Black Friday has gone too far...

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

68th Carnival of Feminists

Check it!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Tuesday, November 04, 2008

OMG OBAMA!

Yes, we could.  Yes, we did!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

GObama!

I hope you'll all be casting your ballots tomorrow...

...for Barack, please!

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Wednesday, October 15, 2008

Some Levity

My sister sent me this comic that made me chuckle...




Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Monday, October 13, 2008

Feminist Carnivaling!

Check out the 66th Carnival of Feminists!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Thursday, October 09, 2008

Shipping Insecurities to CA

I have to recommend this NYTimes article appearing in the modern love section...It's written by a dear friend and mentions moving to Cali. What could be a more appropriate link for a Thursday afternoon?


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Wednesday, October 08, 2008

RIP iBook G4

A dead laptop and a cross-country move does not for regular posting make. Currently mourning my iBook G4, a loyal laptop that I thought would last forever...Praying for resurrection at the Mac store, too.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Tuesday, October 07, 2008

Girl with Pen Group Blog Goes Live

Girls with Pens

Yesterday, the new Girl with Pen group blog went live. Because my laptop died (sad! and blog-inhibiting), I wasn't able to share this awesome event in a timely fashion. About once each month, I will be posting a "Blog U" feature on GWP and there are many other great contributors to keep your RSS feeds full between my articles. New format, new bloggers, same great content - there are so many great reasons to check it out! Why are you still here?! (But do come back!)


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Friday, October 03, 2008

Big News, Big Sabbatical

Moving to the West Country

Big news, ABWAB readers! As if there aren't enough headlines for you to follow as the presidential race gets rarin', I have one more item to add - I will be relocating to the San Francisco Bay Area soon as I begin a new stage of my career. This girl is going tech - interweb search style.

Okay. So...maybe it's not quite major news...I'm not holding my breath about getting on the newscast at six or anything. But I think it's big!

Leaving NYC and my feminist-y life here will certainly be bittersweet, but I am excited by this cross-country adventure I am embarking on. Posting will be light, however, until I get my feet on the ground (perhaps mid-November?). I'm looking forward to experieincing the rich feminist community SF offers - and perhaps meeting a few ABWAB readers out there, too.

Ready or not, Cali, here I come...


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Wednesday, October 01, 2008

Vote, Vote, Vote!!!




Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Wednesday, September 17, 2008

34 Million Friends

Congrats to Jane on conquering the web 2.0 medium!



Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Tuesday, September 16, 2008

The future of the book?


Reducing textbook prices through creative commons licenses? To all you higher ed folks out there - what do you think? Is this the future of the textbook?

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Monday, September 15, 2008

The Economy Is a Feminist Issue

I don't have financial sector expertise, but people of all genders are going to be feeling today's crashes. The economy - a feminist issue. And an election issue, too.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Why are non-college-educated women voting for McPalin?

The NYTimes reports that a recent poll found that "blue-collar women" see their views most aligned with McCain/Palin. Here's a look at the numbers:

How much do you think each candidate shares your own values and principles?

Non-college-educated women who are considered likely voters:

John McCain - 71%

Sarah Palin - 65%

Barack Obama - 52%

Joe Biden - 46%

Likely voters overall:

McCain - 67%

Palin - 55%

Obama - 58%

Biden - 47%


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Sunday, September 14, 2008

A Little Monday Morning Reading

Check out the 64th Carnival of Feminists...


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

SNL Says It Best...

Wednesday, September 10, 2008

There's a Problem with the Pipeline

And Who Says the Glass Ceiling Is Broken?

The NYTimes report on a recent study illustrates yet again why getting more women, especially women of color, into the political pipeline is important:
The report, from the Center for Women in Government and Civil Society at the State University of New York at Albany, tallied how many women and minorities were appointed by governors in the 50 states to leadership jobs between 1997 and 2007. The answer is: not enough. Of 1,834 top state jobs — including advisers to governors, department and commission heads — 643 were held by female appointees, or about 35 percent of the total. Minorities held less than 16 percent.
For me, the most important conclusion drawn from this study is that
elective office is still overwhelmingly a white male occupation...that may have less to do with the glass ceiling than with the pipeline: too few women and minorities are being appointed to top state jobs where they can get the experience and the public attention to establish a political career.

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Tuesday, September 09, 2008

Pro-Decision Quote of the Day

I can't understand a politician who doesn't safeguard the quality of life. It makes no difference if it's a man or a woman. It doesn't make sense for one woman to win if all of us loose.
-Joyce McFadden, on Sarah Palin's reproductive choice policy


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Article On Gender Makes It Into NY Times Science Section

An historic event???

I was pretty surprised (I'll stop short of saying enthused) to see an article about gender appear in the NY Times Science section. Usually such articles are relegated to the Fashion & Style section. Because, if it's about the ladies or the gender issues, the NY Times just knows it belongs in the same section as coverage about purses, lipstick, and high heels. Duh!

I wasn't really wowed, though, by John Tierny's "As External Barriers Disappear, Some Gender Gaps Widen." Reporting on recently published research, Tierny summarizes the findings of Dr. David P. Schmidt:
“In some ways modern progressive cultures are returning us psychologically to our hunter-gatherer roots,” he [Dr. Schmidt] argues. “That means high sociopolitical gender equality over all, but with men and women expressing predisposed interests in different domains. Removing the stresses of traditional agricultural societies could allow men’s, and to a lesser extent women’s, more ‘natural’ personality traits to emerge.”
In other words...Men are from Mars! Women are from Venus! Let's create some scientific research to back up the planetary alignments - or to at least extend the passe debate! Mars! Venus!

I'm not impressed by Schmidt's "proof" against the social construction of gender. And I'm not impressed by Tierny's lack of interrogation of this study. I actually am not sure if I can see how this story is newsworthy given how overly done the "natural" sex traits/behaviors debate is. I think it must have been a pretty slow week in terms of science news...You?


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Friday, September 05, 2008

ABWAB Redesign...


Experimenting with Logos

I'm dying to redesign ABWAB, but I don't exactly have the classiest design software in the world (seriously, you can do a lot in PowerPoint, I swear!). What do folks of this logo and color scheme? Is this the new ABWAB?


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Thursday, September 04, 2008

My Grandma, More Qualified Than Palin

Pipeline Problems

Tongue in cheek, my grandmother recently queried my mother about whether she was qualified to be vice president. My grandmother's point? While Sarah Palin was mayor of a town of 6,000, my grandmother was on the board of selectman* of a town of 16,000. So...Wouldn't that make her more qualified? (Gram for president!)

Being serious about the Governor Palin's VP nomination, though, I think what this situation really illustrates is a problem of pipeline. When the GOP sat down to pick a female running mate for Senator John McCain, it seems like they faced some pretty slim pickings (or just failed horribly in the vetting process). While I'm glad to see women moving into the upper ranks of political field, I'm still disappointed by the very limited number of women who are poised to move into executive office. As Emily's List and the White House Project have been saying for years, it's important to get more women into the political pipeline. But even with the efforts of groups like the Barbara Lee Family Foundation, a robust pool of prospective female politicians primed to step into major state and national executive roles is lacking. In the United States, the percentage of women holding elected office seems to hover in the teens. And when you look at the numbers for women of color holding elected positions...

Let's just say we have a long way to go.

And, while I am no Palin-supporter (while we both share certain sex traits, our stances on sex-ed, reproductive choice, family "values," equal pay, and other issues are just too different for us to be in the same sisterhood this election season), the sexist coverage of her vice presidential nomination is a good illustration of just how long of a way we have to go. (I mean, VPILF, seriously? Seriously???)

I would really like to see a woman in the White House - sitting at the desk in the Oval Office, that is - in my lifetime. And I want to encourage all you to get involved in getting women into elected office - nominate your friends or nominate yourself! Because Sarah Palin** and Hillary Clinton*** are not enough...

*Board of selectman are like town councils - but New England style.

**As I said before, I am not a fan of her politics.

***I am a Hillary supporter voting for Obama. I heart Hillary - and I'm pretty proud of Barack, too.

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Being Trans at Work

What do you all think of Lisa Belkin's NYTimes article "Smooth Transitions" which discusses the experiences of transgender individuals' transitions in terms of the workplace? Even if it is an article in "Fashion & Style," I was pretty happy to see a major newspaper giving thoughtful coverage to this issue.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Wednesday, September 03, 2008

Getting That Girl Power

We Blog For Woodhull
Woodhull Blog Badge
Reading Hannah Seligson's recent NYTimes article "Girl Power at School, But Not at the Office", I had deja vu - or at least an interesting experience very close to deja vu. Seligson's article read much like the mission statement of the Woodhull Institute for Ethical Leadership, the non-profit organization for which I currently work.

Exploring why some young women find the transition from undergraduate life to the professional work world more "wobbly" than their male counterparts, Seligson notes that
outside forces [ie, sexism in the workplace] are only part of the story. I have also seen young women — myself included — getting in the way of their own success. I have found that we need to build a new arsenal of skills to mitigate some of our more “feminine” tendencies. Having lived in a cocoon of equality in college, we may have neglected these vital, real-world skills.
Wende Jager Hyman, Woodhull's executive director, often explains Woodhull's powerful trainings as giving women the tools to "get out of their own way." Without passing judgment on habits, traditions, and other comfortable ways of being, the Institute's curriculum strives to help women understand how they are being received in the world and what tools are useful to them in helping to shape this outside perception.

Uncomfortable asking for a raise or tooting your own horn? Cringe whenever constructive criticism is shared? Feel paralyzed by perfectionism? Find yourself always taking on the mess in the office kitchen? Hate public speaking? A large number of women feel unprepared to handle such dilemmas and the Woodhull Institute's goal is to provide the skills and empowerment needed to "get over" these issues. In other words,
the Woodhull Institute trains women in the practical steps needed to implement their ideas and transform their ambitions for leadership into reality. There is often a gap between a woman's private aspirations and her accomplishments, the Institute's training is intended to bridge this gap by offering leadership training and providing access to colleagues and mentors who will counsel and encourage these women throughout their careers. Woodhull offers empowerment courses on financial literacy and basic business skills, public speaking, negotiation and advocacy, writing, ethics in the workplace, networking and acquiring mentoring relationships.
Which is exactly the type of professional development that Seligson is arguing that women need to succeed in today's work world.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Thursday, August 28, 2008

DNC, Live Blogging, Coach Potato Style

Reacting to Obama's Speech...Or Just My Stream of Consciousness

I wish folks had a chance to watch commercial-free events like this one more often. I feel like the conversation Obama is having with his constituents is so important. He's bringing the issues into a larger public dialogue - and people are listening and engaging. Unlike some of those Sunday radio addresses...I guess I wish politics kept people interested at this level of engagement all the time - and not just when there is a glitzy event every four years or so. But am I being negative in the midst of this exciting event? Oops! Back to the enthusiasm...

What happens to a raisin in the sun?

"America - we cannot turn back!"

"We must pledge once more to march into the future."

VOTE FOR BARACK OBAMA IN '08!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Live Blogging the DNC...Or, At Least Cable Coverage of the DNC

Conversation From Your Favorite Coach Potato

On Foreign Policy: In terms of improving the standing of the United States in the rest of the world, I strongly believe that Obama is the best possible choice for president. I think his sense of global politics and how the US should behave is right on...You?

"so that American is again our last best hope"

Debatery: Are you looking forward to the presidental debates? I don't know if I am...Debates usually make me want to grind my teeth. As Barack said, "the stakes are too high." And this election has been too drawn out? But I don't diss the democratic process - heck no! I just can't take suspense...

"we all put our country first"

"what has also been lost is our sense of common purpose...and that is what we have to restore"

"I know that there are those who dismiss such ideas as happy talk"

"If you don't have any fresh ideas, you use scare tactics...You make a big election about small things...It feeds into the cynicism that we all have about government"

"I realize that I am not the likeliest candidate for this office...This election has never been about me - it's about YOU"


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Live Blogging the DNC...

Coach Potato Convos...Your Turn to Weigh In

What do folks thing of the priorities Obama outlined and his plan to accomplish these goals? I'm psyched about many of his ideas to make change - universal health care, equal pay for equal work, better energy policy...Your thoughts?


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Live Blogging the DNC...Part 3

Coach Potato Conversations Continued

Bring It On, Barack! I'm loving this speech...I hope it's just a preview of what's to come in future State of the Union addresses...

More Great Points:
  • "I don't think Sen. McCain doesn't care about what's going on in the lives of Americans - I just think he doesn't know."
  • The ownership society = you are on your own
  • "It's time for us to change America - and that's why I'm running for president of the United States."
  • Progress (for Dems) = paying the mortage, saving for college funds, 23 million new jobs under Pres. Clinton, average income up for families
  • Strength of economy (for Dems) = new, small business-honors, economy that honors dignity of work, waitress able to take days off on tips
  • Veterans need to be respected when they return home
  • "What is the American promise?" = Freedom + obligation to treat others with dignity, respect + Fiscally responsible and nationally responsible companies + Government should do what we cannot do for ourselves + Gov't should work for us, not against us - and for all + I am my brother's/sister's keeper
  • Obama Change = Better tax code rewarding smaller businesses, individuals + Cut taxes for 95% of all working families + End dependency on oil from Middle East in 10 years + Create energy policy that is good for environment and easy for Americans to adapt to + Better education for all Americans to compete in global economy + College education for all + Affordable, accessible health care for every American + Paid sick days and better family leave + Change bankruptcy laws to protect pensions + Save social security + Equal pay for equal work so sons and daughters have same opportunities + Close corporate loop holes + Review of federal budget to eliminate bad spending...

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Live Blogging the DNC...In My PJs

Coach Potato Conversations...Continued

Great Points Raised by Obama:
  • We need to think of future generations
  • "America, we are better than the last 8 years...We are a better country than this!"
  • "Enough! This moment...this election is our chance to keep - in the 21st century - the American promise alive."
  • "We love this country too much to let the next 4 years look like the last 8."
  • "Eight is ENOUGH!"
  • Sen. John McCain has voted with Pres. Geo. W. Bush 90% of the time [eek, I say]
  • "I'm not ready to take a 10% chance on change."
  • "Sen. McCain has been anything but independent."



Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Live Blogging the DNC (From Afar)

Couch Potato Conversations

So, for all of you sitting at home watching the DNC on the teevees right now - what are you thinking? Share your thoughts, ideas, and opinions in the comments section! I'm live-blogging, so I'll pull them to the top, too...

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Maybe the Cutest Thing I've Seen at the DNC


Babies for Obama!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Tuesday, August 26, 2008

Hillary Supporter for Obama

Live Blogging the DNC Speechifying

I'm so impressed by Hillary Clinton's speech tonight. I heart Hillary - and I will heed her advice to jump in and support the Dem party and Barack Obama. Vote Dem in '08! And make sure your friends, family, and community do, too.

The sisterhood of the traveling pantsuits...FOREVER!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

This September, Blog For Woodhull

Woodhull Blog Badge_Medium...Will You?

Okay, okay. So I've always promised to keep my 9-to-5-related postings to a minimum - but I just couldn't resist the urge to tell you about the online action the non-profit I work for will be taking in September 2008. Much like other blog campaigns, or "we blog for..." days, the Woodhull Institute for Ethical Leadership is inviting bloggers to blog about women's leadership and other topics related to the work the Institute does in the month of September. We even have a cool blog badge for the blog leaders who participate to include with their Woodhull-related posts! So, if you believe in women's leadership, join the WE BLOG FOR WOODHULL campaign...Link-love will be shared by the Institute with participating bloggers.

C'mon - encourage a non-profit that's going all Web 2.0 for women's leadership....


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Sunday, August 24, 2008

Non-Profits 2.0

On August 16th, I went through basic training at the Craigslist Foundation's Non-Profit Boot Camp. An annual event on the east and west coast, the goal of this gathering of non-profiteers is to "educate and empower the next generation of nonprofit leaders and social entrepreneurs, connecting them with valuable industry resources, peers and potential supporters." As a member of that "next generation" who is watching the baby boomers leading in the sector retire, I really enjoyed the opportunity to attend informative sessions and to meet so many people doing great work. On-site, I so wished I had brought my laptop to live-blog the conference. But I did take copious notes - which I will share (late-breaking style) here.

My favorite part of the event was the morning keynote speech delivered by Professor Paul Light of New York University's Wagner School of Public Service. In his address, Light asked what it means to be "non-profit-like" and explored how non-profits are currently perceived and what he hopes they will become.

I cracked up when Light listed the qualities currently associated with non-profits:
  • Incorporated (woot, tax exempt status!)
  • Dependent (on the whims of funders, volunteers)
  • Chaotic (high turnover, unclear leadership, shoestring budgets, and more!)
  • Heroic (the self-sacrificing employee making little pay, but still keeping investment banking hours)
  • Cheap (someoone, somewhere, please get those non-profits some matching furniture and a stapler!)
  • Doubted (71% of the American public thinks charities are wasting money)
  • Stressed out (employee burn out much?)
For me, the point about the stapler really hit home. I mean, my desk is currently furnished with a mini-stapler. Quite adequate...but still.

After going over these often negative attributes, Light then pondered what non-profits would be like if the dedicated individuals in this sector declared "I'M NON-PROFIT-LIKE!" as a point of pride - instead of shorthand for I-wish-we-were-more-like-those-successful-corporations. Light listed these aspirations for what non-profits need to do:
  • Be rigorous - in being transparent about finances and outcomes
  • Be collaborative - by not working for one's cause in isolation
  • Be innovative - new ideas are needed as much as new organizations
  • Be agile - by staying young, fresh, and relevant
  • Be prepared - non-profits should spend wisely, which includes having a reliable infrastructure (the stapler! buy the stapler!)
  • Be independent - by generating revenue that the organization controls-
  • Be just - by paying employees a living wage and by taking proactive steps to prevent burn-out
  • Be audacious - deliver the services necessary while also changing the world that requires those services
  • Be advocates - and change the world
  • Be PROUD
These are definitely qualities that I aspire to in my own work - and I appreciate how succintly and powerfully Professor Light summarized the work that non-profiteers have ahead of them. (And he has several books in which you can read more!)

With so many non-profits out there today and with so much change expected as leaders retire, it is an exciting time to be working in this field. But, as always, non-profit life is also tough. So, dear readers, what would the ideal non-profit 2.0 look like to you?

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Friday, August 22, 2008

Carnival of Feminists No. 63

A Little Friday Fun Reading

Check out the latest Carnival of Feminists!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Tuesday, August 19, 2008

Beware the feminists and their allies!

Another original attack on women's and gender studies.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Thursday, August 14, 2008

Feminist Blogs, Community Style

Everybody's Doing It!

Trend alert! Now, let's discuss...

What do folks think of the new trend feminist blogs are setting as many move to community blog formats? Feministing lead the way and now Salon has incorporated a community blog/social networking feature as well that Broadsheet is promoting. Further, bloggers like Deborah Siegel over at Girl with Pen are musing about making the move to group blogging. Community blogging seems to be the next wave of cyberfeminism.

As a blogger, I totally understand the benefits of group blogging in a content-driven genre. Keeping a weblog - with daily content, the latest widgets, a presence in the newest networking hotspots, building community among readers - is a bit more work than one person should probably bite off - even if they can devote themselves to blogging full-time. Group blogs offer the benefit of multiple contributors and multiple perspectives. They create go-to sources to find experts in specific areas. Plus, the personalities and their quirky interactions keep us coming back for more as readers. Community blogs offer similar benefits with the boon of empowering readers to become bloggers in their own right (and not just in the comments below the fold) while also keeping a blog community united. They are a great tool for teaching/sharing the power of the blogosphere in creating informed blog citizens actively engaging in public debate.

I think one of the beautiful things about blogging is how fluid the genre is. That which we call a blog...Well, let's just say they come in all shapes and sizes and colors and varieties. But the academic dedicated to the analysis of cyberculture and tracking online activism wonders, Where will community blogs take the blogosphere?


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Wednesday, August 13, 2008

What Do Women Want?!


The Center for New Words Wants Politicians to Know

Just had to share this cool new initiative the Center for New Words recently launched...I hope you will follow their lead and let your representatives know what YOU want today!

Tired of being talked about this election season? Done with being represented by skewed polls and stereotypes?

This Is What Women Want is your chance to cut through the spin and tell the media, the candidates and the world exactly what you want this election season. Let’s demonstrate how diverse we are in thought, action, and experience. Let’s uncover what we have in common. Let’s amplify our own and each others’ voices until they cannot be ignored.

This Is What Women Want is a project of the Center for New Words, producers of Women, Action & the Media and many other programs dedicated to developing and amplifying progressive women’s voices.

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Monday, August 11, 2008

This News Brief Is Brought to You By...The Women's Media Center

WMC Daily News Brief: Media Justice, Clinton, Zimbabwe

Are you subscribed to receive the Women's Media Center's "Daily News Brief"? It's a "must-read news source to be fully informed about women's roles in the world." Go get it in your inbox today! And, untuk you do, enjoy this sample...

Long Walk to 'Media Justice' For SA Women
8/8/08
Bizcommunity.com, S. Africa: As South Africa celebrates another Women's Day and Women's Month, the media comes under the microscope, challenged and put to the test by analysts and gender activists who deplore what they call 'unfair', 'sexist' and 'discriminatory' treatment of women by the Fourth-Estate, which is supposed to be the voice of the voiceless and vulnerable groups.

In Wake of Hillary Clinton Bid, Democrats' Platform May Denounce Sexism
8/8/08
LA Times: It's not exactly the language they preferred, but a group of women who had supported Hillary Rodham Clinton's presidential bid is happy with a proposed Democratic Party platform plank that denounces sexism.

Rights Lawyers to Investigate Rape in Zimbabwe

8/7/08
VOA News: AIDS-Free World, an international advocacy group, says it is sending a team of lawyers to Zimbabwe to collect evidence of mass sexual violence, which it says is part of an anti-opposition campaign by supporters of President Robert Mugabe.

ACLU, DGA, AFTRA Gang Up on FCC

8/7/08
Broadcasting & Cable: The American Civil Liberties Union, flanked by unions representing directors and actors, told the Supreme Court the Federal Communications Commission has no business regulating any speech short of outright obscenity.

Roles of Clintons at Convention Start to Clear
8/7/08
NY Times: Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton and Senator Barack Obama are negotiating the delicate question of her role at the Democratic convention in Denver and in the campaign beyond. But at least the convention role of former President Bill Clinton, has been settled with the decision Thursday that he would be speaking at the convention.

McCain, Obama Tiptoe Across Vice Presidential Minefield
8/8/08
LA Times: Obama has heard complaints from women's advocates about possible No. 2 contenders whom they do not see as strong supporters of abortion rights. "That is causing a lot of heartburn" for abortion rights supporters, said Kim Gandy, president of the National Organization for Women.

Official Says New Rules Are Not Anti-Birth Control
8/7/08
AP via Seattle Times: Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt attempted to ease concerns Thursday that the Bush administration is planning to issue new rules that would limit women's access to birth control.

Kosovo Lives: Not Gone with the Wind
8/7/08
BBC News: The Americans evacuated three Slovenian-Serb women from Urosevac in 2004, to save them from Albanian rioters, who then destroyed the house.
But the Nikolic women have refused to join the thousands of other non-Albanians who fled. They argue that K-For failed to defend their property and removed them against their will.

Violence Linked to Rapid Rise of AIDS in Women
8/08/08
Women's eNews: Health officials at a global AIDS conference in Mexico City this week highlighted the growing feminization of the pandemic and its link to gender violence. The U.N. may form a women's agency that advocates say could mount a more effective response.

Lack of Access to Female Condoms Vilified
8/8/08
GlobeandMail.com, CN: Once touted as a key tool in the fight against HIV-AIDS, a way of empowering women whose partners shun traditional condoms, the female condom has largely been forgotten.The fault lies not with the product itself but with set-in-their-ways policy makers, the international aid group Oxfam says in a scathing new report.

Common Treatment For Infertility Ineffective: Study
8/8/08
AFP: A drug taken by millions of women in recent decades to improve the chances of conceiving a child yields the same results as no treatment at all, according to a study published Friday.

Beginning Her Career Purely By Accident

8/8/08
Boston Globe: A young woman from Philadelphia, an amateur musician with career aspirations elsewhere, writes and sings a few songs for personal use. Next thing you know, Melody Gardot is the new sensation in sultry vocal jazz. But inextricably woven into the blossoming of Melody Gardot is the horrific accident that nearly killed her four years ago.

Olympic Outlook: View From the Executive Seat
8/7/08
Wall St. Journal: Anita L. DeFrantz, an Olympic bronze medalist and a member of the International Olympic Committee since 1986, discusses her role in the Olympics over the years and her push to increase the number of women's events on the Olympic program.

Swimmer Inspires Sisters to Shoot for Beijing
8/8/08
NY Times: At a camp for aspiring swimmers at Stanford University in 2000, Dara Torres met Sandra and Danielle Fong, 10 and 8 years old, who dreamed of one day becoming Olympic athletes. Torres gave them the medal she had recently won for breaking the American record in the 50 meters at the Santa Clara International Invitational.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Sunday, August 10, 2008

Feminist Carnivaling

The 62nd Carnival of Feminists is now available at Rage Against the Manchine!

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Wednesday, July 30, 2008

Carnival of Feminists #61

Check out the latest!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Lady Bloggers Today - Where Are They Now?

Over at Broadsheet, Rebecca Traister has a thought-provoking article looking at the recent NYTimes coverage of the recent BlogHer and Netroots conference and critiques that BlogHer was represented as a feminized, girly gathering whereas Netroots was presented as a serious, powerful political summit. Broadly considering the position of female bloggers in today's blogosphere, Traister wonders if women bloggers are creating a "blogosphere of their own" in response to how the wild west/old boy's club style interwebs have treated them to date. She writers,
It's interesting that one of [Feministe's] PhysioProf's chief complaints about Jesella's [NYTimes]story [about the BlogHer conference] concerns the shift in conversation away from how to survive the boys' world. If the key to success lies with BlogHer's closing speakers, dating blogger Stephanie Klein and mommy blogger Heather Armstrong, both of whom have become wealthy doing what they do, and if the terrifically screwed-up scheduling conflict between Netroots and BlogHer means anything, then perhaps it's that in some quarters of the Internet, women have decided that all the wheel spinning in a blogosphere unwilling to offer them traction is a waste of their time. Maybe they're ready to pack it in and head back to their own corner, to attend a conference, and create a blogosphere, of their own.


For me, Traister's article is a nice 1-year-later reminder of the work that I did in my M.A. thesis that catalogued how female bloggers fare in the male-dominated blogosphere as well as a good call to action to continue to be mindful of how women bloggers are navigating the blogosphere and how gender (as well as race, class, etc) constructs shape this digital space.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Monday, July 21, 2008

Republic of Gilead?

Why Americans Should Fear for Their Reproductive Rights

Ever feel like you're trapped in a dystopian novel? The Bush administration's recent push to redefine abortion so broadly that birth control and emergency contraceptive would be considered as such has made me feel a little like I woke up in Margaret Atwood's The Hand Maid's Tale. Don't get me wrong - I love that book - it's a great feminist read. But it certainly isn't on my list of novels to come true in real life (I'm more interested in attending Hogwarts than being re-educated to be a walking womb).

Luckily, Senator Hillary Clinton has a post up over at RH Reality check that gives me hope that I will avoid wearing a red cloak...


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Sunday, July 20, 2008

Calorie Counting

How young is too young?

This weekend, I had the luxury of spending a day down the Jersey Shore with my bff. In preparation for our beach trip, we stopped at a local grocery store to pick up some picnic supplies. While we were trolling for a few good snacks, we observed the followiing exchange between a mother and her tween-age daughter:

Daughter: Mom - can we get these? [Holds up a bag of potato chips.]
Mom: What's the calorie count per serving?
Daughter: Um...120 calories.
Mom: And the fat?
Daughter: I don't know - can we get them?


While I think that it's very important to be informed food consumers and I totally agree that parents should be proactive in teaching their children about healthy nutrition, I found this interaction to be a bit jarring. Why were calorie counts and fat grams being discussed instead of the difference between healthy snacks and junk food? The ability to parse a nutrition label is an important skill - but without looking at the whole food picture, you can come to the wrong conclusions. For example, advocados are high in fat, but are a very healthy option for getting "good fat" in your diet.

After watching this mother-daughter exchange, I just had to wonder about what the best way to teach children, especially tweens, about healthy nutrition is in our weight-obsessed culture. What age is too young for calorie counting?

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Tuesday, July 01, 2008

Blog U: Getting Active Online - Final Thoughts

Getting Active Online (Part 4)

In an increasingly wired culture, you probably find yourself spending more and more time online – for work, for fun, for shopping, and more. Wouldn’t it be great if you could effortlessly transform some of that time into powerful activism? These simple steps listed below will help you to become an activist on the internet – the easy way.

Crafting Your ONLINE IDENTITY


It is important to be a savvy when deciding how you want to present yourself in the public sphere of the internet. Increasingly, employers and universities’ admissions committees evaluate an individual’s online presence as a part of their decision-making process.

The Way Back Machine: Did you know that the internet is being archived daily? Unlike what happens in Vegas, what happens on the internet stays on the internet, forever – and is publicly available and accessible for years to come.

Crossposted.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Monday, June 30, 2008

Real Men Drink Coffee, Not Cosmos

Daddy Groups

Oh, the NYTimes Fashion and Style section. I have such mixed feelings about this part of the paper (is it really fit to print?). It's the section I love to hate - and I do have to admit that I would miss it's navel-gazing "trend" reporting (or, more accurately, trend killing) if it ceased to appear on a weekly basis.

My most recent bemusement came from Andy Newmans's "The Wife's at Work, So...," an article that chronicled the morning meetings of a "breakfast club" of NYC dads who gather after dropping the kids at school while the wife whisks off to work. While work-at-home mums have been meeting and greeting over cups of joe for ages, a new species of fatherly bonding has recently been observed. It seems drop-off dads are friendly folks, too. And that find it beneficial to spend time with their peers talking about the ups-and-downs of family life.

Now, I want to be clear - I am by no means down on parents having grown-up moments, exchanging anecdotes and advice, or others having being supportive. I think it's awesome that these particular dudes found “a way to honor fatherhood in the moment that we’re all engaged in our kids starting out in life together, and to blow off some steam doing it.” And I dig the turn towards dads being more involved - and less stigmatized - as active and equal parents.

But I'm just not sure what is so remarkable about guys drinking coffee together? Is it that boys are supposed to drink beer? Or why the ritual was "Sex"-ed up with a reference to the HBO fab four's cosmo-drinking habit? Would it be equally novel if it was a group of moms and dads? Are playground mothers really so clique-y that they shun the fathers in the after-school pick-up crowd? And why is the end-of-school-see-you-in-September sequence so awkwardly portrayed for these fatherly friends?

I guess I'm just wishing that dads could be, well, dads without it seeming so strange - and headline worthy.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Sunday, June 29, 2008

Blog U: Getting Active Online - Blogging

Getting Active Online (Part 3)

In an increasingly wired culture, you probably find yourself spending more and more time online – for work, for fun, for shopping, and more. Wouldn’t it be great if you could effortlessly transform some of that time into powerful activism? These simple steps listed below will help you to become an activist on the internet – the easy way.

Enter the BLOGOSPHERE.


New media technologies are allowing individuals who would not be able to have a voice in mainstream, traditional media venues to share their thoughts and opinions with a larger public. Weblogs, or blogs, are one example of DIY internet publishing that has created an alternate sphere of reporting and social commentary – and they are becoming increasingly accepted and popular as primary news venues. To be heard in the blogosphere, all you need is an internet connection and a little know-how.

Step 1: Find blogs on topics that you find interesting and that report news that is relevant to your pursuits.

Resources for finding blogs:
-BlogHer lists blogs by topical categories written by and for women on a wide variety of topics.
-BlogCarnival.com lists blog carnivals that provide round-ups of the best blog writing on the web on specific topics.

A Blog What?: A blog carnival is “a type of blog event. It is similar to a magazine, in that it is dedicated to a particular topic, and is published on a regular schedule, often weekly or monthly. Each edition of a blog carnival is in the form of a blog article that contains permalinks links to other blog articles on the particular topic” (Wikipedia.com). Blog carnivals are great if you do not have a lot of time to read blog articles daily, but would like to read a current summary of what is being written on a specific topic in the blogging world.

Step 2: Automate information delivery by signing up for email alerts and RSS feeds from the websites and blogs you most frequently visit.

Popular RSS Feeds:
-Bloglines
-Google Reader

Step 3: Share your opinion on blogs by commenting on blog posts.

Step 4: Submit your own blog articles to blogs for publication as a guest poster or columnist.

Some Places to Get Started Guest Posting:
-A Blog Without a Bicyle
-Girl with Pen (Right here!)
-Huffington Post

Guest Post How-To: Deborah Siegel at Girl with Pen offers great tips on how to write a blog post.

Collect Clips: Are you an aspiring journalist? The blogosphere is a great place to amass your first clips to build your writing portfolio.

Step 5: Start your own blog.

Crossposted.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Friday, June 27, 2008

Blog U: Getting Active Online - Wikis

Getting Active Online (Part 2)

In an increasingly wired culture, you probably find yourself spending more and more time online – for work, for fun, for shopping, and more. Wouldn’t it be great if you could effortlessly transform some of that time into powerful activism? These simple steps listed below will help you to become an activist on the internet – the easy way.

Contribute your expertise to increasing web knowledge through WIKIS.


The internet is quickly becoming the premier information repository that people utilize in their daily life. You can help shape what information is available online and how it is presented by contributing your expertise to the creation and editing of wikis.

Wiki Definition: A wiki is “software that allows users to create, edit, and link web pages easily. Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites and to power community websites” (Wikipedia.com).

Step 1: When you are using a wiki to find information and seen an inaccuracy, correct it! As open public-created documents, wikis give you the power to edit erroneous information.

The most popular generalist wiki is Wikipedia.

Raise Your Voice: Statistically, female internet users outnumber male internet users. Women are underrepresented, however, as contributors to wikis. This means that women’s voices are left out of the social reality that is created in the catalogues of information wikis contain.

Step 2: Create entries on topics that have been left out of popular wikis.

Women Missing: In a survey of 200 Wikipedia biographies, futurebird found that only 16% were about women. Further, articles on feminist topics were reported to be of poor quality.

Step 3: Start your own wiki on a specific topic.


Crossposted.

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Wednesday, June 25, 2008

Blog U: Getting Active Online - Social Networking

Getting Active Online (Part 1)

In an increasingly wired culture, you probably find yourself spending more and more time online – for work, for fun, for shopping, and more. Wouldn’t it be great if you could effortlessly transform some of that time into powerful activism? These simple steps listed below will help you to become an activist on the internet – the easy way.

Join a SOCIAL NETWORKING website.

Social networking websites allow you to quickly and easily connect with individuals who share similar interests. Because of their rhizomatic nature, these websites facilitate strongly networked collaborations between people who may have never otherwise connected because of geographical or other constraints.

Step 1: Find the social networking website that is right for you.

Popular Social Networking Websites:
-Facebook
-MySpace
-LinkedIn
-Second Life

Good News: Feeling overwhelmed by the number invitations to join these websites that you receive? Google is working on streamlining the online social experience with Open Social.

Step 2: Use your new network to connect with individuals doing similar work, to support causes you believe in, or to raise awareness about important issues.

Organizing Activism: Ms. Magazine (Winter 2008) recently reported on “an underground movement” of individuals who organized via Facebook to protest sexist advertising in the tube system by placing stickers with messages on them has gained national attention in the United Kingdom. Increasingly, off-line activism is being organized online.

Find Your Cause: Facebook allows users to create “Causes” around specific issues and to fundraise for specific non-profit organizations. Many individuals and organizations report success in social networking-based fundraising.

Crossposted.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Tuesday, June 24, 2008

Non-Profits Networking and Using Web 2.0 Tools

Share Your Success Stories!

I've spent a lot of time during at my day job thinking about the best ways for non-profit organizations to utilize social networking and web 2.0 tools. I've had great success with Facebook, mass e-communications clients, pitching to bloggers, and other tools. And I always enjoy the opportunity to share tips with other folks working hard for their non-profit and its mission. In fact, I'm working on a guest column over at Girl With Pen on the topic of making new media technology - specifically blogs - work for individuals, organizations, and their causes.

But that doesn't mean I know it all - or that I don't want to learn new tricks! The world wide web gets a bit wider every day and keeping up with all of the latest trends can be quite a marathon. So, I'd really love to hear some "case studies" about successes you've had making online activism work for your non-profit's cause. I know there are a lot of experts on this topic out there.

Did you twitter and get your constituents to sign a petition about an important piece of legislation? Did you raise a big chunk of change using a Facebook cause? Has your website won an award? Did your blogging radically raise your organization's profile?

Share those success stories down in the comments...


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Monday, June 23, 2008

Blog U: An Introduction

I will be guest-posting over at Girl With Pen. In true blogging fashion, I'll also crosspost my writing here in ABWAB.

Hey, GWP readers! This is new guest blogger, Elizabeth M. Curtis here. Loyal GWP readers might remember my previous posts that provided cultural critique and gender analysis. Well, now I'm returning to GWP - as a regular like Courtney Martin and Laura Mazer - to talk about blogging and you.

Many folks want to get more active online and make web 2.0 tools work for them and their causes. But sometimes a lack of tech know-how gets in the way. So, I'll be sharing the secrets of online activism and the blogosphere that I've learned since I started blogging way back in 2006 (ages ago in online time!). My goal is to break down the blogging basics and to demystify web 2.0 technology for the folks who can't wait to get active online, in the blogosphere, and beyond. A "Blog U," if you will.

My first two tutorials offered to "Blog U" students will focus on getting active online and deciding whether or not your organization (or yourself!) is blog-ready. I'm looking for future tutorial topics as well. Let me know what you're interested in exploring in the comments section or email me your queries.

Also, I'll be cross-posting my "Blog U" posts on my own blog. Stop by for PDFs of "Blog U" material.

Crossposted.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Friday, June 06, 2008

NCRW Morning Session (Post 4)

Evelyn Hu-deHart: Evelyn Hu-deHart reflects on her own career and how personal and poignant this discussion is to her own experiences in academe. She speaks about Duke University’s lacrosse team scandal and its effects on Duke’s women of color faculty. Hu-deHart notes that Duke University is on the “good list” of institutions but that such crises really exemplify the leadership’s position and the real status of minority faculty at such universities. She worries that issues of diversity are just a “numbers game” in terms of institution’s PR. Hu-deHart muses on her personal job searches as a women of color candidate. As someone in the trenches, she shares anecdotal evidence as to why we must move to the next step in diversifying higher ed. She speaks to the power of the practice of a diverse institution. Hu-deHart identifies the “culture piece” as the most important element to work on in effecting positive change. She also notes that “higher ed.” is a term that is too amorphous and imprecise. Her final thoughts focus on the question of how to make the decision-makers care deeply about these issues and read the pertinent reports (or attend these panels!).

Q&A

Audience Member: What would a truly diverse higher ed. institution look like?

Veronica Aerrola: What is the most effective way to present our data? How can we ethically show our demographics and deal with the lack of clarity that results from the manipulation of data?

Audience Member: Brings up the issue of institutional culture and access to elite universities. What can we do since not every student can go to Harvard?

Audience Member: Brings up the question of the “trailing spouse” in terms of dual academic couples. What about partner hiring issues? What can we do about the fact that women are continuing to be the trailing spouses?

The conversation gets exciting and resources are recommended.

Allison Kimmich, National Women’s Studies Association Executive Director: Allison Kimmich points out the need for a collaborative communications effort organized among stakeholders to get this information out into the public domain and to make it a mainstream issue.

Homework Assignment

The panel leaves us with a homework assignment – a call to go back to our campuses and:
• Be sure that there is a group on your campus that is asking these questions and keeping track of how all women are doing.
• Learn about your own institutions policies and share this information with peers and colleagues.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.