Wednesday, January 30, 2008

Blogging Tips

Looking for ways to up your blog skills? Check it.

And, yes, I'm just sending the linklove over to GWP today. There's just been great posts over there!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Hillary Galore

What do really women think about Hillary for President? Check out the great coverage in More Magazine.

Via Girl with Pen


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

On Women & Work

Gender and the Workplace: Career Education for Women

Tonight I had the opportunity to speak on a panel about gender can impact one's career experience organized by Columbia University's Center for Career Education. My fellow panelists were wonderful and the students in attendance asked many smart questions.

While the panel focused more on sharing personal experiences and giving advice based on profession-specific knowledge, I couldn't resist sharing a few important factoids about women's wages that I came across while doing a little background reading for my presentation:

Did you know that college educated women earn 80% of what their male colleagues make in their first year out of college? Did you know after ten years, however, these women only earn 69% of what their male colleagues do? The American Association of Unversity Women has an excellent report on these and other aspects of the Pay Gap. And Catalyst provides other helpful information the status of working women.

I invite my fellow panelists and the students in attendance to share their views on this event and working as a woman in the comments section. I'm looking forward to more great discussion!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Monday, January 28, 2008

Live Blogging the State of the Union

Part 3: Final Thoughts

"To build a future of quality health care, we must trust patients and doctors to make medical decisions and empower them with better information and better options."


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Live Blogging the State of the Union

Part 2: The Analysis

What I found most striking about Dubya's speechifying tonight was the way that he described his health care ideal - imagine a day when Americans have more choices, more options and decisions are made between doctors and patients without government intervention.

He almost could have been talking about smashmortion.

I really, really can't wait to get the transcript of the State of the Union. Because I don't think I heard him right on that one...


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Live Blogging the State of the Union

Part 1: The Anecdotal

So, I started watching the State of the Union (Bush's last ever!) at the gym. I thought it would be motivating. You know, like every time he said something I disagreed with, I would move faster. Let's just say that I'm not sure if I will be able to walk tomorrow...

Eventually, I decided that I was going to have to seek another State of the Union viewing venue. I was afraid that there was going to be a YouTube video titled, "Crazy Girl At Gym Watching Political TV." It would feature impassioned facial expressions and a few elementary school style tongue sticking outs. So I rushed home. It was a nice break.

Now I have moved onto ice cream...


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Live Blogging the State of the Union

Part 1

So, I started watching


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Sunday, January 27, 2008

Carnival of Feminists #52

Some super Sunday feminist reads are available in the 52nd Carnival of Feminists...


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Friday, January 25, 2008

Complicated Relationships

On Attending a "Sister School"

If you know me, you probably also know that I am a Barnard College alumna. Or, more accurately, you know that I am a "strong, intelligent, beautiful Barnard woman" (that's the unofficial school motto). Which translates into "very-proud-alum-bordering-on-walking-admissions-brochure."

One aspect of my undergrad experience that often vexed me, though, was the relationship between Barnard and its brother school, Columbia University. Explaining the relationship between the schools is complicated - even when talking to other students or administrators on campus. Basically, Columbia University - back in the day - was determined to keep women out of its classrooms. Citing a variety of reasons from the distractions the boys would face from female classmates to the emminent damage education would pose to women's reproductive health, CU trustees kept women off campus for quite a long time. Eventually, however, they were forced to deal with all the uppity women-folk who were demanding education. Their solution was Barnard, which became one of the Seven Sisters Colleges.

But, somehow, overtime, those CU trustees managed to create an independent college with full rights and privileges to Columbia. This complicated relationship has led to much friction between CU and BC students. Phrases like "Barnard to bed and Columbia to wed" or "Barnard: the backdoor to Columbia" are aimed at BC students by CU students - men and women alike. BC students often retaliate by citing the fact that they *don't* have to take CU's core courses (haha!) or that BC women have been attending CU since 1889 - while CU women only arrived in 1983. Let's just say that a lot of love is lost in the university community because the relationship between BC and CU has not been clearly articulated to students, faculty, staff, the world...

So, I was pleased to see a smart article published in the Columbia Spectator better defining the facts of the mattter. I can't say that I was surprised to see that it was written by a Barnard woman.

Rosalind Rosenberg's book Changing the Subject: How the Women of Columbia Shaped the Way We Think About Sex and Politics provides a detailed explanation of how the BC-CU relationship has grown and changed over the years. I highly recommend this scholarly text to anyone interested in exploring how sexism and attitudes towards women's education have evolved historically in the United States.

Here's to dear old Barnard...

And thanks to I.G. for the tip!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Tuesday, January 22, 2008

Choice Blogging

Blog for Choice Day

More great Blogging for Choice posts!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Blogging for Choice

Blog for Choice Day

Why I am Voting Pro-Choice?

As a U.S. citizen, I have the luxury of voting in the 2008 presidential election. I have the opportunity to influence U.S. policy by visiting the ballot box. I can make my opinion known to the U.S. government - that reproductive choice must be protected - and help to ensure that the politicians who are elected to office will protect this right. Because my ability to vote allows me to hold U.S. policymakers accountable.

Many women and men worldwide who are deeply effected by U.S. policy, however, do not have the ability to to shape the very policy that determines their reproductive self-determination. The global gag rule prevents many individuals from having access to a full range of basic reproductive health care - and, in many cases, this fact radically changes these individuals' lives. But so many of the people who are most personally and profoundly effected by U.S. reproductive policy, well, they don't get to vote in the 2008 presidential election.

So, as someone who has the privilege to weigh in on reproductive choice and U.S. policy, how could I not take full advantage of this opportunity to support and to ensure reproductive freedom - for myself, for my community, for my country, and for my world?

That's why I vote pro-choice.

What Is Blog for Choice Day?

Sponsored by NARAL, Blog for Choice Day,
provides us with an opportunity to raise the profile of reproductive rights in the blogosphere and the media, while celebrating Roe's 35th anniversary. Plus, it's a great way to let your readers and the mainstream media know that a woman's right to choose is a core progressive value that must be protected.


How Can I Get Involved

Want to get more involved in blogging for choice? It's not too late! Start by joining the Facebook group I'm Celebrating the 35th Anniversary of Roe v. Wade.



Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Monday, January 21, 2008

I'll be Blogging for Choice on January 22, 2008.

Blog for Choice Day

Will You?

Celebrate the 35th anniversary of Roe v. Wade by participating in Blogging for Choice!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Friday, January 18, 2008

Why I Blog

I see my blogging as a form of social activism in the way in which I share information about important issues that I believe need attention in the world today. Blogging from a feminist perspective, I hope that the social commentary that I provide helps to support the eradication of sexism, racism, classism, heterosexism, and other forms of oppression.

But I can't do it alone. I'm lucky to be a part of the strong (and powerful!) community created through the feminist blogosphere. When I first started blogging, I received so much support from many gracious blog-mentors.

To "pay if forward," I'd like to offer this resource guide on how you can get active online, if you're not already involved in cyber-based social activism (kudos if you are!) or if you are looking for new ways to get involve. This guide is a part of the material that I give out at workshops in which I teach online activism and blogging basics (if you're interested in having me facilitate such a workshop for your organization, please contact me at ablogwithoutabicycle(at)gmail.com).

As always, your ideas and feedback are welcome. Enjoy!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Wednesday, January 16, 2008

Looking for a Few Good Blogs

What do you recommend?

As part of one of my other projects, I'm currently trying to get a lay of the feminist blogosphere in terms of what blogs are out there that focus on women and media or are generated by a non-profit that focuses on women's issues. I have a short list of a few blogs in these two categories that I found through a quick web search and the blog resources I'm familiar with. I know, however, that there must be tons more blogs analyzing all things women+media and that many non-profits working on women's issues have blogs.

So, I thought I would turn to you, ABWAB readers - What are your favorite blogs in these categories? Please share via the comments section...

Also, to share and share alike, here are some of the blogs I've found:

Women & Media

Broadsheet

WIMN’s Voices

Women’s e-News

Non-Profits Serving Women

Change Everything Blog (Whitehouse Project)

Our Bodies, Our Blog

The Women’s Foundation

Women’s News Network

Women’s Initiative


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Tuesday, January 15, 2008

Not Your Average Mudflap Girl


By day, I work at the Woodhull Institute for Ethical Leadership and one of the major elements of our leadership trainings is to empower women to own their achievements and to feel confident asking for what they need to succeed. Which is something that many women don't feel entitled to do or comfortable doing - at least not without a little encouragement.

So, when Alicia DeBrincat, ABWAB reader, worked up the courage to ask me to mention her awesome feminist art here, I just couldn't say no. Debuting the ABWAB feminist art gallery with a thought-provoking portrait - here's Alicia!

Photo cred: Alicia DeBrincat

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Monday, January 14, 2008

Women's and Gender Studies - On the Map

So, yes, I'm a huge dork - but I am so excited that the National Women's Studies Association has finished the first stage in their project to
collect data [to] provide a comprehensive portrait of [women's and gender studies] programs and how they manifest themselves in different U.S. institutions of higher education.
There is a comprehensive report of the information they analyzed about 652 women's and gender studies programs - and an executive summary for folks who prefer 1-pagers. I'm off to get started on reading the results...


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Carnival of Feminists #51

Returns to the Source

Back on Philobiblon, it's the best feminist blog digest out there!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Saturday, January 12, 2008

What about the IRB?

When I was conducting research for my M.A. thesis, I often bemoaned the tedious and bureaucratic process I faced as my university's Institutional Review Board (IRB), which had to approve all research projects before they could more forward, was housed in the medical school. There were countless times when I was frustrated as a social science researcher because I was being held to the standards of medical research and because non-experts were dictating the terms of my study. Despite the unnecessary hoops I jumped through, I did recognize that the basic purpose of the IRB was a good thing - research should be monitored and held to high ethical standards. Horrorific research projects conducted before systematic review was instated, like the oft-cited Tuskegee Syphillis Study, make the need for such review all too clear.

On reading Carl Elliott's "Guinea-Pigging" in the January 7, 2008 edition of the New Yorker, I recalled the long and boring research course my university's IRB required me to complete before I could move ahead in my research. A good amount of the information in that course was irrelevant to my internet-based research, but I could not help thinking that the "commercial-research enterprise" that has sprung up since pharamaceutical companies started moving their testing out of slow academic environments to faster-paced private venues could benefit from sitting through a similar training. Elliott reports on the unethical treatment of study participants - who often come from underprivileged groups - and notes that 70% of drug trials taking place in the private sector and 50% of trials taking place outside of the United States and Western Europe today.

While my personal experience navigating IRB paperwork and process left me a bit...bitter (?), I always felt like my consolation was that the medical research going through the same review process as mine would be conducted ethically. So, even if I was a square peg being sent through a round hole, the IRB was serving its purpose. It concerns me to think that it has become so easy to circumnavigate the strict review of academic environments altogether via a less-regulated private sector. Because although my lasting impression of IRBs might be an image of endless paperwork, IRBs exist to protect human subjects - people like you and me.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Thursday, January 03, 2008

My Cyber-face

Online Perfomativity

Okay, so any NYTime article that references Goffman's theory of performativity does pique my interest. And if it's an article online self-presentation! I mean, I did write a whole M.A. thesis that, in part, considers what behavior - through the regulation of the public sphere - is "acceptable" online (and why...like, why is it okay to threaten violence against women if they are self-identified feminists?).

While there is nothing particularly groundbreaking per se in "Putting Your Best Cyberface Forward," I do see this article as a great quick-read for instructors to share with students. Being media savvy these days means a lot more than learning to be skeptical of information in advertisements or checking the veracity of internet sources. It's also about self-presentation - specifically the art of crafting one's life, online - and the repercussions that online play has offline (and vice versa).

Musing: I wonder what my own personal online "brand" is...


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

If a fetus is a person...

Over at Feministe, Jill provides excellent musings on the consequences of giving fetuses full personhood and defining life as beginning at fertilization. On a day of (U.S.) political circus, her thoughtful post was a nice change in pace from the media antics currently featured...on just about every major news venue in the U.S. of A.&*

*Which is not to say that I am not a fan of democracy. Indeed, I am. I am just not a fan of major news conglomerates.**

**As a feminist, I felt the need to clarify that point. Just in case...


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Wednesday, January 02, 2008

New Feminist-y Carnival

Pro-Choice Carnival

Check out the new Pro-Choice Carnival, which was
created to showcase the best pro-choice writing. It has been born out of a concern that we must not be complacent about the legality of a woman’s right to abortion, and we must keep fighting for it to be legalised in those countries where it is still considered a criminal offence.
A bi-monthly pro-choice read!

Via Feministing


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Tuesday, January 01, 2008

Y2K8


Happy 2008, ya'll! Here's to hoping it turns out to be even feminist-ier than 2007.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.