Wednesday, July 30, 2008

Carnival of Feminists #61

Check out the latest!


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Lady Bloggers Today - Where Are They Now?

Over at Broadsheet, Rebecca Traister has a thought-provoking article looking at the recent NYTimes coverage of the recent BlogHer and Netroots conference and critiques that BlogHer was represented as a feminized, girly gathering whereas Netroots was presented as a serious, powerful political summit. Broadly considering the position of female bloggers in today's blogosphere, Traister wonders if women bloggers are creating a "blogosphere of their own" in response to how the wild west/old boy's club style interwebs have treated them to date. She writers,
It's interesting that one of [Feministe's] PhysioProf's chief complaints about Jesella's [NYTimes]story [about the BlogHer conference] concerns the shift in conversation away from how to survive the boys' world. If the key to success lies with BlogHer's closing speakers, dating blogger Stephanie Klein and mommy blogger Heather Armstrong, both of whom have become wealthy doing what they do, and if the terrifically screwed-up scheduling conflict between Netroots and BlogHer means anything, then perhaps it's that in some quarters of the Internet, women have decided that all the wheel spinning in a blogosphere unwilling to offer them traction is a waste of their time. Maybe they're ready to pack it in and head back to their own corner, to attend a conference, and create a blogosphere, of their own.


For me, Traister's article is a nice 1-year-later reminder of the work that I did in my M.A. thesis that catalogued how female bloggers fare in the male-dominated blogosphere as well as a good call to action to continue to be mindful of how women bloggers are navigating the blogosphere and how gender (as well as race, class, etc) constructs shape this digital space.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Monday, July 21, 2008

Republic of Gilead?

Why Americans Should Fear for Their Reproductive Rights

Ever feel like you're trapped in a dystopian novel? The Bush administration's recent push to redefine abortion so broadly that birth control and emergency contraceptive would be considered as such has made me feel a little like I woke up in Margaret Atwood's The Hand Maid's Tale. Don't get me wrong - I love that book - it's a great feminist read. But it certainly isn't on my list of novels to come true in real life (I'm more interested in attending Hogwarts than being re-educated to be a walking womb).

Luckily, Senator Hillary Clinton has a post up over at RH Reality check that gives me hope that I will avoid wearing a red cloak...


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Sunday, July 20, 2008

Calorie Counting

How young is too young?

This weekend, I had the luxury of spending a day down the Jersey Shore with my bff. In preparation for our beach trip, we stopped at a local grocery store to pick up some picnic supplies. While we were trolling for a few good snacks, we observed the followiing exchange between a mother and her tween-age daughter:

Daughter: Mom - can we get these? [Holds up a bag of potato chips.]
Mom: What's the calorie count per serving?
Daughter: Um...120 calories.
Mom: And the fat?
Daughter: I don't know - can we get them?


While I think that it's very important to be informed food consumers and I totally agree that parents should be proactive in teaching their children about healthy nutrition, I found this interaction to be a bit jarring. Why were calorie counts and fat grams being discussed instead of the difference between healthy snacks and junk food? The ability to parse a nutrition label is an important skill - but without looking at the whole food picture, you can come to the wrong conclusions. For example, advocados are high in fat, but are a very healthy option for getting "good fat" in your diet.

After watching this mother-daughter exchange, I just had to wonder about what the best way to teach children, especially tweens, about healthy nutrition is in our weight-obsessed culture. What age is too young for calorie counting?

Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.

Tuesday, July 01, 2008

Blog U: Getting Active Online - Final Thoughts

Getting Active Online (Part 4)

In an increasingly wired culture, you probably find yourself spending more and more time online – for work, for fun, for shopping, and more. Wouldn’t it be great if you could effortlessly transform some of that time into powerful activism? These simple steps listed below will help you to become an activist on the internet – the easy way.

Crafting Your ONLINE IDENTITY


It is important to be a savvy when deciding how you want to present yourself in the public sphere of the internet. Increasingly, employers and universities’ admissions committees evaluate an individual’s online presence as a part of their decision-making process.

The Way Back Machine: Did you know that the internet is being archived daily? Unlike what happens in Vegas, what happens on the internet stays on the internet, forever – and is publicly available and accessible for years to come.

Crossposted.


Please note that as my M.A. thesis project is complete, the George Washington University is no longer overseeing research conducted in conjunction with this blog (effective June 2007 to present). The Informed Consent Materials created while this blog was under GWU's IRB oversight are still available for your information and the principles outlined in them are still being used as a general guide for my continued work.